Loam in Cheshire

Loam in CheshireTop-quality loam in Cheshire will boost your grounds’ or garden’s health quotient. We are a reliable, well-established firm of landscape gardeners with many years’ professional experience in this sector. We are proud of our reputation for supplying quality products and services to both domestic and commercial clients across the Cheshire region and beyond. We provide premium quality turf, topsoil, MOT, bark mulch, play bark, professional amenity lawn seed and fertilizer. No matter how big or small your requirement, we are glad to provide the right assistance. Our highly trained and experienced team can help you with planting and soil advice to suit your needs, preferences and budget. All prices are available on our website to help you make the right choice.

For all types of gardens in Cheshire, loam is the perfect base for plant growth, health and sustenance. Plants need soil that provides nutrition, good drainage and the ability to hold stable roots. Loam is a mix of different soil types that have been blended to provide the right combination of all these qualities. Generally, loamy soil contains less than 52% sand, between 28-50% silt and about 7-27% clay. According to a general rule of thumb, equal parts of sand and silt, with half as much clay is the ideal blend. However, this mixture can be modified according to the existing soil type in your garden or grounds. We also test the pH levels to determine acidity/alkalinity balance and this gives you information on the types of plants that will grow best here.

The right balance of loam in Cheshire can produce rich crops and blooms. This is because it provides good drainage, proper root aeration, nutritional qualities and a more open structure for roots to thrive. Whether you’re putting down new flower beds and a lawn or replacing old soil, we’re the go-to firm, so contact us today. Experienced gardeners can test soil type by simply picking up a handful and squeezing it into a ball. If it doesn’t hold, there is an excess of sand. If it holds shape and compresses into a hard ball, there’s too much clay. Silty soil forms a loose ball that crumbles after a while.

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